business

So Lidl reacts bravely to the claims of Lemonaid

So Lidl reacts bravely to the claims of Lemonaid

As a reminder: Lemonaid had confronted Lidl with plagiarism on Tuesday. In an open letter to Lidl boss Jesper Hojer threw the founder of Lemonaid Paul Bethke the discounter, with him copied three new "limo" varieties of Lemonaid. Both in the flavors and in the design of the bottles.

Limo dispute: Lemonaid Lidl agrees with these motives

A reproach that seems more than justified when comparing Lemonaid bottles with those of Lidl, as shown by a survey among HORIZONT online readers, most of whom are on the side of Lemonaid (see Opinary poll below). And what does Lidl say about that? Not much. The discounter is trying hard to get the cow off the ice. A spokesperson said at the request of HORIZONT Online that lemonade is an action product that was "available in mid-July in some regions of Germany". Meanwhile, the limousine is no longer offered in stores.

Much smoke around nothing so? That is unclear. Because really interesting is what Lidl says indirectly plagiarism. And to accusation, unlike Lemonaid, no organic and Fairtrade ingredients, however to use artificial ingredients: "

With the design of our product, we have met the customer's desire for a modern, attractive packaging, the ingredients that we clearly mention in the bottle ", says the Group.

An answer that raises further questions. Why, for example, does Lidl invest in the development of a new product, only to put it on the shelves for a few weeks? Or that Lidl intends to offer the "promotional product" on a permanent basis if the sales figures were satisfactory during the promotional period. With which the cow would slide back on ice. But Lidl does not comment on that. "Please understand that in principle we do not comment on sales figures and the future range of products," says a concise statement from the press service.

The Lemonaid makers, who are still waiting in vain for Lidl's answer, will therefore keep their eyes open and, if necessary, reopen the case if Lidl offers its soft drinks again. This is not entirely unrealistic. The Group has already proven that it does not avoid conflicts with start-ups. In Spain, for example, Lidl was recently prosecuted for patent infringement. mas

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