Marion County does not confirm any cases of measles in the Salem area

The photo of the file shows the characteristic eruption of measles.

SALEM, Oregon. – Marion County officials say a laboratory report confirms that there is no case of measles in the Salem area.

Negative test results came Saturday afternoon after county officials confirmed they were investigating a suspected case.

There are currently 53 confirmed cases of measles in Clark County and two suspected cases, and it is feared that the epidemic may continue to spread.

Clark County reported that it had no new confirmed cases.

Symptoms of measles begin with a slight fever, cough, runny nose and red eyes, followed by a rash.

If you or your child have gone to one of the possible exposure sites and shown signs of measles, contact your doctor before entering so they can limit someone else's exposure in the waiting room.

The Oregon Health Authority has established a call center for general questions about measles – it can be reached by dialing 2-1-1 between 9:00 am and 5:00 pm.

Of the Clark County measles cases, officials say most of the patients were not immunized, six people did not have the vaccine confirmed and one person received only one dose of the MMR vaccine.

The CDC says that one dose of the MMR vaccine is 93% effective, while two doses of the vaccine are 97% effective.

Children typically receive the first MMR vaccine at one year to 15 months and the second at 4-6 years.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT MARION HEALTH MEASURES AND HUMAN SERVICES:

Measles is the highest risk for unvaccinated pregnant women, children younger than 12 months and people with a weakened immune system.

Symptoms of measles begin with fever, cough, runny nose and red eyes, followed by an eruption that usually starts on the face and spreads to the rest of the body.

Common complications of measles include ear infection, pulmonary infection and diarrhea. The swelling of the brain is a rare but much more serious complication.

After someone has contracted measles, the disease develops in about two weeks, but people can be infectious days before they know they are sick.

Measles is a highly contagious virus that spreads in the air after a person has coughed or sneezed. People are contagious with measles for four days before the rash appears and up to four days after the onset of rash. The virus can also linger in the air for up to two hours after someone is contagious.

A person is considered immune to measles if ANY of the following conditions apply:

1. You were born before 1957.

2. Your doctor has diagnosed measles.

3. A blood test shows that you are immune.

You have been completely vaccinated against measles (a dose for children aged 12 months to 3 years, two doses in all 4 years and over).

.

Leave a comment

Send a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.