Health

Mosquitos in Cache County test positive for West Nile Virus

Mosquitos in Cache County test positive for West Nile Virus

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Some mosquitos in Cache County recently tested positive for the West Nile Virus, officials there say, and residents are being warned to take precautions to avoid exposure.

HYRUM — Some mosquitos in Cache County recently tested positive for the West Nile Virus, officials there say, and residents are being warned to take precautions to avoid exposure.

The Cache Mosquito Abatement District said in a release on its website that groups of tested mosquitos, called “mosquito pools,” which were trapped on Aug. 7 tested positive for the West Nile Virus in both Hyrum and Benson.

“This is the peak period for (West Nile Virus) so please wear long-sleeved shirts and pants and use and approved insect repellant when outdoors between dusk and dawn” when the mosquitos with the virus are most likely to be active, the Cache Mosquito Abatement District’s release said.

Hyrum city assured residents on Facebook that abatement officials “will be fogging and (larviciding) twice a week.”

“Make sure that you use repellent and cover up as much as possible if you (are) going outdoors,” the city urged on Facebook.

West Nile Virus has also been detected in mosquitos this year in Salt Lake, Davis, Weber, Box Elder and Tooele counties, according to the Cache Mosquito Abatement District.


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According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, ways to prevent exposure to West Nile-infected mosquitos include ensuring working screens are on doors and windows at home and checking that there is no standing water in toys, buckets, planting pots or other equipment in the yard.

The West Nile Virus displays no symptoms in four out of five people infected, but for those who do get ill, symptoms include body aches, diarrhea, vomiting, rash and long-term fatigue, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Typically about one in 150 people who are infected become severely ill, and 10 percent of those who are seriously ill will die, the agency says.

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