Health

Type II diabetes can fall back with intermittent fasting

Type II diabetes can fall back with intermittent fasting

Intermittent fasting may be the solution for diabetes and pancreatic problems, according to scientists / Illustration by rolloid.net

Intermittent fasting may be the solution for diabetes and pancreatic problems, according to scientists / Illustration by rolloid.net

London, October – Research suggests that planned intermittent fasting may help reverse type II diabetes, after the trial of three patients who could reject insulin treatment, BMJ magazine Case Reports reported Thursday.

In a statement, the doctors responsible for the study indicate that lifestyle changes are the key to control the disease, but by themselves they can not always regulate glucose levels in the blood.

Medicines can control symptoms and help prevent complications, but they do not stop the disease, they said.

During the test, the men between the ages of 40 and 67 took different medications to control the disease, as well as the daily units of insulin.

Approximately one in ten people in the United States and Canada have type II diabetes, which is associated with other serious diseases and premature death

Two of the men fasted on alternate days for 24 full hours, while the third fasted three days a week. On fasting days they were allowed to drink beverages with a very low calorie content, such as tea / coffee, water or broth, and at night to eat a meal with a very low calorie content.

Participants remained in this pattern for about 10 months, after which they were again measured in fasting blood glucose, mean blood glucose, weight and waist circumference.

The three men could stop injecting insulin a few months after the start of their fasting program. In one case this lasted only five days.

Two of the men were able to stop all their other diabetes medication, while the third stopped with three of the four medications that he used.

According to the specialists, they all lost weight, in addition to reducing their average blood glucose and blood glucose levels, which can help reduce the risk of future complications.

Approximately one in ten people in the United States and Canada have type II diabetes, which is associated with other serious illnesses and premature death. (PL)

There is a dizzying increase in the number of people with diabetes on an international scale; at the beginning of the 21st century the figures were around 150 million people with diabetes: a real pandemic; in 2010 the number was 225-230 million, and it is even expected to reach 380 million by 2025 and reach 438 million by 2030, an estimated increase of the population aged 45 to 64 in the third world countries. (Scielo)

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