Zombie deer disease is spreading rapidly in Iowa, says DNR

WEBVTT A disease called – Zombie Deer Disease – is spreading rapidly in the Midwest – and right here in Iowa. It is a condition of chronic loss, very similar to Mad Cow Disease a few years ago. And as reported by Max Diekneite of KCCI, there is no cure. Chronic Wasting Disease … now, better known as "Zombie Deer Disease" … is becoming one of the most important titles in the Midwest … While scary … C-W-D, it's not new. The first case was discovered in Colorado in 19-67. Since then, the deadly disease has spread to 23 other states … besides Canada, Norway, Finland and South Korea. It spread to Wisconsin in 2002 … where thousands of deer have contracted the disease. In 20-13 … Iowa DNR registered its first positive test along the Wisconsin border. We have seen a total of 44 from … 17 of these, coming – only in the last year. There are things you can do – to prevent them from spreading. The DNR advises not to feed wild deer … and to throw carcasses in landfills. According to the CDC … the signs of an infected deer include: drastic weight loss, drooling, lack of coordination and aggression. Still … there is no evidence that C-W-D can spread to humans but the CDC advises against eating any deer tested

Zombie deer disease is spreading rapidly in Iowa, says DNR


Wildlife biologists say that chronic wasting disease is spreading rapidly among deer in Iowa. The disease, also called zombie deer disease, infects the nervous systems of deer and elk and is always fatal. The condition creates holes in an animal's brain, making its appearance like a zombie's, and spreads through deer-deer contact. No human case has ever been registered. The disease has been identified in at least 24 states, including Iowa, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It has also been detected in Norway, Finland, Canada and South Korea. "They have lost all fear of humans," said Dale Garner, who heads the Iowa Wildlife Department of Natural Resources. "They are lethargic and went up". The first case of chronic wasting disease was discovered in Colorado in 1967. It then spread to Wisconsin, where thousands of deer have since contracted the disease. The fatal disease appeared for the first time in a herd of wild deer. in Iowa in 2013. Since then, there have been 44 confirmed cases of chronic wasting disease, and 17 of these cases only arrived in the last year. "It's a disease you can not get rid of," Garner said. "There is no cure until now: as long as you have deer on the landscape and continues to spread from animal to animal, you'll probably have more." CORRELATED: Here's what you need to know about the "zombie" deer disease Scientists worry that the "zombie deer's disease" can infect human beings DNRI officials advise against feeding wild deer and throwing carcasses in landfills, to prevent the spread of disease. They also advise against eating any deer that has proven positive for the disease. "Until we find a silver bullet, we just want to control the spread of the disease to the best of our ability," Garner said. "The hunt is done by eliminating some of those animals, and this is what controls the populations." According to the CDC, the signs of an infected deer include drastic weight loss, drooling, lack of coordination and aggression.

Wildlife biologists say that chronic wasting disease is spreading rapidly among deer in Iowa.

The disease, also called the zombie deer disease, infects the nervous system of deer and elk, and is always fatal. The condition creates holes in an animal's brain, making its appearance like a zombie's, and spreads through deer-deer contact.

No human case has ever been registered.

KCCI-TV

The disease has been identified in at least 24 states, including Iowa, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It has also been found in Norway, Finland, Canada and South Korea.

"They lose all the fear of humans," said Dale Garner, who leads the Iowa Department of Natural Resources. "They are lethargic, they went up."

The first case of chronic wasting disease was discovered in Colorado in 1967. It then spread to Wisconsin, where thousands of deer contracted the disease.

The fatal disease first appeared in a herd of wild deer in Iowa in 2013. Since then, there have been 44 confirmed cases of chronic wasting disease, and 17 of these cases have only arrived in the year last.

"It's a disease you can not get rid of," Garner said. "There is no cure until now: as long as you have deer on the landscape and continues to spread from animal to animal, you'll probably have more."

reported:

Irowa DNR officials advise against feeding wild deer and throwing carcasses into landfills to prevent the spread of the disease. They also advise against eating any deer that has proven positive for the disease.

"Until we find a silver bullet, we just want to control the spread of the disease to the best of our abilities," Garner said. "The hunt is done by eliminating some of those animals, and that's what controls the populations."

According to the CDC, the signs of an infected deer include drastic weight loss, drooling, lack of coordination and aggression.

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