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News Daily: criticized police financing and Barnier & # 39; s Brexit & # 39; optimism & # 39;

News Daily: criticized police financing and Barnier & # 39; s Brexit & # 39; optimism & # 39;

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Policing pressure

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The Whitehall expenditure watchdog has accused the Interior Ministry of having failed to understand the impact of budget cuts on the police – or that the fight officers are faced with effective service provision. The National Court of Audit called the approach "ineffective" and "distant", and said that ministers did not really know whether the system was "financially sustainable".

The NAO found that officers now take an average of four days longer to charge suspects than in recent years – something our domestic business correspondent Dominic Casciani says is the workload rather than increasing crime – and there is less & # 39; proactive work & # 39 ;, like highway stops from dangerous drivers and breath tests. Here Reality Check explains what exactly happened financially.

The Interior Ministry insists that it understands the pressure on police work, and later today Interior Minister Sajid Javid will tell police inspectors that he is doing everything he can to support them. However, the president of their body will tell the same conference that many forces are "on the verge of a crisis".

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Deal & # 39; is executable & # 39;

Theresa May's critics have invented many reasons why her Brexit strategy – the so-called Checkers plan – is doomed to fail. However, the EU chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, has now shown a sense of optimism, saying that agreement on a future UK-EU relationship is possible at the beginning of November if both parties are "realistic". He said that there were "many, many points of convergence" – although he warned that the British proposals for trade relations were a direct challenge to the EU's founding principles.

BBC Europe editor Katya Adler said that the more cheerful tone of Mr. Barnier showed that Brussels was aware of Mrs May's domestic political problems and "planned to throw her as much of a lifeline as possible". These problems most recently took the form of warnings for a conservative commons revolt against the Dammen plan. Our political editor Laura Kuenssberg says that the government's plan is to stay calm and continue – and hope ultimately that MEPs will vote for every deal that is reached, because the alternative – no deal – is a more scary option.

Read our introductory guide to the Checkers plan and see here an overview of the key data that will appear in the Brexit timeline.

Arch enemies?

The railroad arches of Great Britain accommodate a wide range of businesses, from cafés and car repair shops to gyms and microbreweries. Now, Network Rail sells these sites – along with the rest of its commercial real estate portfolio – £ 1.46 billion to help finance rail upgrades. Tenants say that they fear that their rents will rise or that they will be forced completely.

Serena Williams and & # 39; angry black women & # 39;

By Ritu Prasad, BBC News

The "angry black woman" trope has its roots in 19th century America, when minstrel shows mocking African Americans became popular. Blair Kelley, associate professor of history at North Carolina State University, says black women are often played by fat overweight men who colored their faces black and put on thick suits "to make them look less than human, unmanly, ugly" . "Their main way of dealing with the men around them was to scream and fight and get angry, irrationally, in response to the circumstances around them," she says.

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What the newspapers say

The smiling face of Alastair Cook who leaves the field for the last time as an English cricketer appears on many front pages & # 39; s. In terms of stories, many lead the somewhat optimistic Brexit prognosis of Michel Barnier. I call his intervention "Operation Save Theresa", but warns that every deal is still faced with "sabotage" in the House of Commons and throughout Europe. The Daily Express sees it slightly differently and calls it a "shockdowndown" by the EU chief negotiator. The Times reports that the Prime Minister has sent its ministers a "final ride" to sell its Checkers agreement to its "divided party" prior to the Conservative Conference later this month. Elsewhere, the Daily Mirror reports that Debenhams was able to silence up to 80 stores in the "latest eruption" of the British high street with an expert who told the newspaper that the department store was "broken."

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