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Sebastian Vettel: "My biggest enemy is myself"

Sebastian Vettel: "My biggest enemy is myself"

Sebastian Vettel wants to make the turnaround in Singapore: In the championship standings, he is 30 points behind Lewis Hamilton.
 The week-long discussions about team-mate Kimi Raikkonen have cost energy, in the end Vettel's desire for a whereabouts of the buddy was not met.
 The relationship with Ferrari seemed ever close.

    
                    
       By Elmar Brümmer, Singapore
    
        

              
  
            
        

    

                        
    
    How easy it is but the unique world champion in Formula 1. They are doing as television commentators in the racing circus, because motor sports apparently so complicated and complex that you need even more experts than in tennis or football. If you look for opinions on Sebastian Vettel and its chances to finally 2018 but still world champion in Ferrari, then you meet them, the unique. Damon Hill, champion of 1996, says, "Ferrari has a problem and it's called Lewis Hamilton, so it's worth every penny while Vettel collapses under pressure." Nico Rosberg, Hamilton's team-mate until his title win and resignation in 2016, teaches Heppenheimer on British TV: "You can not beat Lewis Hamilton if you make so many mistakes." That's a fact, if Sebastian does not change, Sebastian can win the World Cup to forget."

    
    
        
        
    

                        
    
    The one to be criticized sits in the sultry darkness of Singapore relaxing on a porch near the Ferris wheel around which the night race will turn on Sunday, heralding the crucial third of the season. Last year, Vettel had come with three points behind the Marina Bay Street Circuit, this time it is 30. At that time, it was said that Ferrari could create the turnaround on the track, the Mercedes is the least. This time it is mandatory.

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After all, in front of the Ferrari Pavilion Sebastian Vettel finally has a teammate at his side, on which he can rely 100% – an energetic Italian with the small inscription "Security" on the red shirt. But he does not need the assistance next to the track. The racer looks over his usual claque in the first row of seats and then says in a firm voice in the round: "My biggest enemy is myself." Reflection and self-criticism seem to be the order of the day in Scuderia. Maurizio Arrivabene, who as a team principal and his German chauffeur has been trying for three and a half years to bring Formula One's oldest racing team back to the top, says when asked about Vettel's mistakes: "They call it mistakes, but I'll never go for a single one The only mistake is in front of them, if we do not get the results we expect, then I alone will be responsible. "

    
    
        
        
    

                        
    
    The Singapore Grand Prix is ​​the first of seven races in just ten weeks, but the Marina Bay Street Circuit is the most exhausting and unpredictable course of all. Last year, Sebastian Vettel started from the pole position, which counts even more than in Monte Carlo, but he did not move much further than the first corner, where he collided with his teammate Kimi Raikkonen. Afterwards he found himself standing in the opposite direction to the driving direction. Like two weeks ago in Monza when he also turned 180 degrees after trying to fend off an overtaking maneuver by Lewis Hamilton. A scene Vettel would never have gotten if he had started from pole position. However, his team-mate Kimi Raikkonen started from the very front.

    
    
                    
        
        
    

                        
    
    If in Singapore the same situation as in Monza should occur, Vettel is now sure, "that it would not go out like this again". And although Raikkonen now knows that he will be deported to the Swiss Sauber team at the end of the season in exchange with Charles Leclerc. This raises again the question of team reason: Aid or failure to provide assistance. The analyst Vettel asks: "In many things you should not reinterpret so much psychology, we both know how to do our job." Mercedes is clearly on a stable order, but Ferrari just frightened so far back. "For me, basically nothing changes, it's all situational," says Vettel.

    
    
        
        
    

            
        
            
        
            
        
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