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Panic and pain show the efficiency of the Gunners

Panic and pain show the efficiency of the Gunners

The panic par excellence and the pain of the transfer day was evident this summer. It illustrates perfectly the importance of the efficiency of Arsenal this summer, standing in front of what has happened before. I love the deadline transfer. The drama, the uncertainty, the traveling relationships, the suspicious airport sightings, the clandestine clandestine in the parking lot of the training camp, the carter, the manager of the old school, the clever, silent conspiratorial agents. It's all quiet, softly, whispers, envelops, talking, to the peak! The deal is done. I enjoy it a lot more when Arsenal is not involved. As a fan of Arsenal, there are a few more frustrating things than trying out the repetitiveness of Sky Sports News images, waiting for the deal to be done. I still remember being there for a whole day on a tenterhooks when Mesut Ozil was rumored to be on his way or when Arsene Wenger spent the day with the Pope, seemingly uninterested in what he was supposed to play in London Colney! Only the day limit of transfer could raise such a story. More from Pain in the Arsenal, but this year has been a very subdued affair. The major offers of the day arrived in Everton and Fulham. In fact, none of the traditional six best has made a permanent signature: Chelsea has secured the signing of the loan of Matteo Kovacovic. This, however, is not due to lack of attempts, especially in an amused, discouraged, infuriated White Hart Lane and Old Trafford. The Spurs and Manchester United would have expected a signature. Jose Mourinho said he had five central goals. At the beginning of the summer he wanted two. Then his goal slipped to one. Thursday morning, he had resigned himself to missing all five, even making desperate attempts at the last attempt to sign Diego Godin of Atletico Madrid. The Spurs, meanwhile, have become the first team in Premier League history not to sign a single player across the window. The two clubs have had a paltry day of expiry. But they should not have been in a position like that. They were pleased first in the window. They were not quick in their ratings; they did not do their approaches early enough. They waited too long. And then they were panicking to sign someone, someone, of relative quality. Do you want to hear your voice? Join the Pain In The Arsenal team! Write for us! This, I think, is the biggest aspect of Arsenal's summer window. Even if they are not necessarily in agreement with every move they made, at least they were efficient and effective in their business. They recognized an area of ​​need in the team, found a player who faced that need, and then went to get it. In the beginning of July, their business was over. They clash with the recent mechanisms of the club's summer windows. How many times have we seen Wenger jumping desperately from mediocre player to mediocre player in the last days of the window just to face a position that everyone knew they had to face two months before? Not this time. Next: Arsenal Vs Manchester City: 5 key players to watch It was nice to sit and watch the craze of the day of the deadline to know that there was no pressure on Arsenal to do anything. They did their business. They were efficient ones. And this really is a sign of a very good summer.

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