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A whale of the story: Lost Narwhal finds new & # 39; various & # 39; friends

A whale of the story: Lost Narwhal finds new & # 39; various & # 39; friends

A view of a small drone flying over the pod of young beluga showing the darker narwhal among them. (Gremm)

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The narwhal, an iconic Arctic species, is almost never seen in the south.

In one way or another one narwhal, who was considered a young man, was lost, really lost and ended far south in the St. Lawrence.

Not only that, but the narwhal seems to have joined a group of beluga's that seems to have accepted the stranger completely.

Arctic beluga and narwhal areas overlap, but the beings rarely react with each other.

Here you see the distinctive narwhal tusk against the white skin of the beluga below. (Gremm)

Beluga tend to prefer and hunt in shallower water and stay near the coast, while narwhals tend to be deep divers when they are looking for food.

After the last ice age a part of the beluga remained in the St Lawrence, while the rest of the species moved to the far north. With about 1,000 km they separate, Arctic beluga and St Lawrence beluga have no interaction.

Researchers identified the narwhal as being the same in previous seasons by comparing skin markings (GREMM)

Experts believe that because in this case because narwal and beluga are both very social in comparison, it may have contributed to the merging of the two species; the narwhal looks for companions, and the beluga adds a member to their group

Although both communicate with clicks and chirps, it is not known how similar or different their language & # 39; language & # 39; can be and how the two species can communicate with each other.

GREMM- via youtube- "swim as only one of the boys"

What is also unusual is that the observation was made for the first time in 2016, and researchers saw the same narwhal with the group in 2017 and also this year, suggesting that the narwhal has decided to call the St Lawrence home, and the beluga as a family.

Additional sources of information