CES joins futuristic new products from around the world (but are gadgets now too curious?)

The annual Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas ended on Friday after four days full of the latest futuristic solutions for all areas of life.

Relaxation technology was a big theme this year, with companies such as Adilson and Neural Up showing tight pods that allow you to briefly escape the stress of life, even in busy environments.

As in previous years, delivery robots that were designed to transport food and parcels were again an important force at CES, with new bots coming from both large technical companies and lesser known startups.

Smart devices for beauty and health, connected devices and futuristic entertainment products dominated the show floors of the convention as usual.

But many of the latest gadgets are also the best.

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Solaari showed his new light source with an infinite palette of blade colors & # 39; and a battery life of six hours. The new gadgets are shown above at CES

Solaari showed his new light source with an infinite palette of blade colors & # 39; and a battery life of six hours. The new gadgets are shown above at CES

Solaari showed his new light source with an infinite palette of blade colors & # 39; and a battery life of six hours. The new gadgets are shown above at CES

This week's CES tech show in Las Vegas was a showcase for cameras that stream the living room, bathroom mirrors with beauty tips and gadgets that track the heartbeat of unborn children.

All will collect some kind of data about their users, whether it's photo or monitor readings; how well they will protect it and what they are planning exactly are the important and often unanswered questions.

These functions can be useful – or at least fun – but they all open the door for companies and their employees to take a look at your private life.

Only this week, The Intercept reported that Ring, a company with security cameras from Amazon, gave various employees and executives access to recorded and sometimes live video footage of customers' homes.

Our data-driven age now forces you to weigh the usefulness of a smart mirror against the risk that strangers are watching you in your bathroom.

A smart home mockup can be seen in the Tuya stand at CES International, Wednesday 9 January 2019, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo / John Locher)

A smart home mockup can be seen in the Tuya stand at CES International, Wednesday 9 January 2019, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo / John Locher)

A smart home mockup can be seen in the Tuya stand at CES International, Wednesday 9 January 2019, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo / John Locher)

During a demonstration at the CES, Solaari unveiled how the light swords make even the characteristic sound when they collide and hum when they are on

During a demonstration at the CES, Solaari unveiled how the light swords make even the characteristic sound when they collide and hum when they are on

During a demonstration at the CES, Solaari unveiled how the light swords make even the characteristic sound when they collide and hum when they are on

Even if a company takes your privacy into account, something can go wrong: hackers can break in and gain access to sensitive data, or your ex can hold a video feed long after you split up.

It is not as if all these technologies are inherently bad, "says Franziska Roesner, a researcher in the field of computer security and privacy at the University of Washington.

But she said the industry is still trying to find the right balance between delivering useful services and protecting the privacy of people in the process.

Like other security devices, Ring cameras can be mounted outside the front door or in the house; a phone app shows you who is there.

But the Intercept said the company in Amazon companies also allowed certain high-level technicians in the United States to view the video feeds of customers, while others in the Ukraine office could view and download any video file from a customer.

As in previous years, delivery robots designed to transport food and parcels were again an important factor at CES. Sterela showed his slim new Trolley bone

As in previous years, delivery robots designed to transport food and parcels were again an important factor at CES. Sterela showed his slim new Trolley bone

As in previous years, delivery robots designed to transport food and parcels were again an important factor at CES. Sterela showed his slim new Trolley bone

Made by the French TwinWheel, Fresh Geoffrey & # 39; a robotic butler droid that maps your home, like a Roomba, for easy navigation

Made by the French TwinWheel, Fresh Geoffrey & # 39; a robotic butler droid that maps your home, like a Roomba, for easy navigation

Made by the French TwinWheel, Fresh Geoffrey & # 39; a robotic butler droid that maps your home, like a Roomba, for easy navigation

JD.com's delivery robot can transport up to six packages autonomously at the same time. The Chinese company has deployed the devices on university campuses and plans to bring these to elsewhere soon

JD.com's delivery robot can transport up to six packages autonomously at the same time. The Chinese company has deployed the devices on university campuses and plans to bring these to elsewhere soon

JD.com's delivery robot can transport up to six packages autonomously at the same time. The Chinese company has deployed the devices on university campuses and plans to bring these to elsewhere soon

In a statement, Ring said that some Amazon employees have access to video's that are shared publicly through the company's Neighbors app, which wants to create a network of security cameras in an area.

Ring also says that employees receive extra video from users who agree to such sharing.

At CES, Ring has announced a video doorbell with an internet connection that fits into the peep holes in apartment doors or dormitory doors.

Although it does not seem, Ring still uses facial recognition. Reports show that Amazon recently filed a patent application for a facial recognition system with camera's for home security.

It is one thing to place cameras in our own home, but Alarm.com wants us to put them in other people's homes.

Relaxation technology was a big theme this year, with companies such as Adilson (pictured) with slender pods that let you escape the stress of life, even in busy environments

Relaxation technology was a big theme this year, with companies such as Adilson (pictured) with slender pods that let you escape the stress of life, even in busy environments

Relaxation technology was a big theme this year, with companies such as Adilson (pictured) with slender pods that let you escape the stress of life, even in busy environments

The Wellcam van Alarm is for caretakers to look at from far away and is usually designed to check in with aging family members. Someone who lives elsewhere can use a smartphone at any time to peek inside, says Steve Chazin, vice president of products.

The idea of ​​placing a camera in someone else's room can be disturbing.

Wellcam says that video streaming is only started when someone activates it from a phone and then it stops when the person turns it off. Chazin says that such cameras are becoming more acceptable because loved ones want to know that the ones they care about are safe & # 39 ;.

Just make sure you trust who you give access to. You can not turn off the camera unless you unplug the power cord.

The new door view cam can be seen in the Ring stand before CES International, Monday 7 January 2019, in Las Vegas.

The new door view cam can be seen in the Ring stand before CES International, Monday 7 January 2019, in Las Vegas.

The new door view cam can be seen in the Ring stand before CES International, Monday 7 January 2019, in Las Vegas.

The French company CareOS presented a smart mirror with which you can try different hairstyles & # 39;

Face recognition helps the mirror's camera know which person is in a household, while augmented reality technology looks over your actual image with animation about how you might look.

The new door view camera can be seen in the Ring stand

The new door view camera can be seen in the Ring stand

The new door view camera can be seen in the Ring stand

CareOS expects hotels and salons to purchase the $ 20,000 Artemis mirror – making it more important that personal information is protected.

"We know we do not want the whole world to know what is happening in the bathroom", said co-founder Chloe Szulzinger.

The mirror does not need an internet connection to work, she said.

The company says it will comply with the stricter privacy rules of Europe, which came into force in May, regardless of where a customer lives. Customers can choose to share their information with CareOS, but only after explicitly agreeing how it will be used.

The same applies to companies that buy and install the mirror.

Customers can choose to share certain information, such as photos of the hair loss they received last time when they visited a salon. However, the companies do not have access to anything stored in user profiles unless users specifically allow it.

Some gadgets now collect intimate information.

Yo Sperm sells an iPhone attachment that tests and traces the quality of the sperm. To protect privacy, the company recommends that users switch their phones to airplane mode while using the test.

The company says that data within the app stays on the phone, although there is a button for sharing data with a doctor.

This week's CES tech show in Las Vegas was a showcase for cameras that stream the living room, bathroom mirrors with beauty tips and gadgets that track the heartbeat of unborn children. In the photo, a model carries the Owlet Band pregnancy monitor at the Owlet booth

This week's CES tech show in Las Vegas was a showcase for cameras that stream the living room, bathroom mirrors with beauty tips and gadgets that track the heartbeat of unborn children. In the photo, a model carries the Owlet Band pregnancy monitor at the Owlet booth

This week's CES tech show in Las Vegas was a showcase for cameras that stream the living room, bathroom mirrors with beauty tips and gadgets that track the heartbeat of unborn children. In the photo, a model carries the Owlet Band pregnancy monitor at the Owlet booth

Smart devices for beauty and health, connected devices and futuristic entertainment products dominated the show floors of the convention as usual. Smart baby monitor Miku is shown on CES above

Smart devices for beauty and health, connected devices and futuristic entertainment products dominated the show floors of the convention as usual. Smart baby monitor Miku is shown on CES above

Smart devices for beauty and health, connected devices and futuristic entertainment products dominated the show floors of the convention as usual. Smart baby monitor Miku is shown on CES above

Meanwhile, Owlet is planning to sell a portable device that sits on a woman's pregnant belly and follows the fetal heartbeat. According to the privacy policy of the company, personal information is collected.

And users can choose to share heartbeat information with researchers who study stillbirths.

Although such data may be useful, Forrester analyst Fatemeh Khatibloo warns that these devices are not regulated or controlled by US privacy laws.

She cautions that companies may be able to sell data to insurance companies that, for example, can establish that someone is drinking caffeine during a pregnancy – potentially increasing health risks and policy premiums.