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Elon Musk & # 39; s & # 39; Starlink & # 39; space internet plan goes a step closer to reality

Elon Musk & # 39; s & # 39; Starlink & # 39; space internet plan goes a step closer to reality

The plan of Elon Musk to offer a worldwide Internet via a huge network of satellites in orbit around the earth is a step closer to reality.

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has approved plans of the billionaire entrepreneur to deploy 7,518 extra broadband satellites for the Skylink project.

With this, the total number of possible satellites for the ambitious plan of the SpaceX founder has risen to 11,943.

SpaceX's Starlink broadband service uses these additional satellites in a nearby orbit to increase capacity and reduce latency in densely populated areas.

SpaceX plans to eventually develop Skylink's infrastructure and apply it to colonized planets such as Mars.

The proposal was unanimously accepted by the American body and they said in a concept that the satellites would operate on frequencies between 37.5 and 42GHz to communicate between space and earth.

& # 39; After reviewing the record, we conclude that the allocation of the SpaceX application serves the public interest, "according to the FCC.

Full acceptance is still dependent on Starlink according to strict criteria regarding energy consumption, possible interference with other stalks and minimizing space debris.

Each satellite in the planned SpaceX group weighs approximately 850 lbs (386 kg).

The original 4,425 satellites will run at heights of 1,150 km to 1,275 km.

From this height, each satellite can cover an area on the ground of about 2,100 km wide.

Musk has also claimed that SpaceX's broadband network at this distance has latencies of only 25 ms.

Starlink's latest series of satellites could circle even closer to Earth at a height of between 208 miles and 215 miles (335 km and 346 km).

The project, which Musk previously said would cost at least $ 10 billion (£ 8.03 billion), was first announced in January 2015.

Professor Mark Handley of University College London devised a detailed clip of how the SpaceX project is likely to work.

The seven-minute footage shows 32 different track surfaces with 50 satellites each rotating on each other.

Detailed: Professor Mark Handley of University College London has created a detailed overview of how the SpaceX project is likely to work in the solar system

Detailed: Professor Mark Handley of University College London has created a detailed overview of how the SpaceX project is likely to work in the solar system

Visualization: the seven-minute footage that will be presented at a conference next week shows 32 different track surfaces with 50 satellites rotating on each

Visualization: the seven-minute footage that will be presented at a conference next week shows 32 different track surfaces with 50 satellites rotating on each

It illustrates the most likely way they are placed – and how they interact with each other to prevent collisions.

Mr. Handley based his visualization on information from Musk's public documents to the US Federal Communications Commission.

I wanted to understand what it could mean for the future of the Internet, and whether it would work well enough to repay itself & # 39 ;, Handley told MailOnline.

In order to do this, I wrote a computer simulation based on one that is in public archives, and filled in the rest of the basic physics and my knowledge of networks.

"If they can build it, and I think they probably can, it promises to revolutionize the internet by providing good connectivity all over the world."

The video also suggests that there will be a density of satellites across London, Paris, New York and Frankfurt at latitudes between 47 and 52 degrees.

  Expensive ambitions: the SpaceX project, which Musk previously said would cost at least $ 10 billion (£ 8.03 billion), was first announced in January 2015 and launched in February.

Expensive ambitions: the SpaceX project, which Musk previously said would cost at least $ 10 billion (£ 8.03 billion), was first announced in January 2015 and launched in February.

Realistic: Mr. Handley based his visualization on information from Musk's public documents to the US Federal Communications Commission, which previously approved the project.

Realistic: Mr. Handley based his visualization on information from Musk's public documents to the US Federal Communications Commission, which previously approved the project.

This, adds Handley, is because it will probably serve mainly financiers.

However, the real question is who will pay for it? What the simulations show is that this network can significantly reduce the communication delay for long-distance traffic, "he said.

& # 39; That's nice for videoconferencing and gaming, but it's crucial for the financial sector. In that company, if you know something a few milliseconds for someone else, you can make money.

So I think that this network will be paid by the financial sector, which probably will not have a choice to use it – if they do not, they lose money to the companies that do.

And in the background it will suddenly become cost effective to do things like placing solar-powered transmission towers that connect via Starlink in the middle of remote parts of Africa, giving them access to information that the rest of take us for granted. & # 39;

WHAT IS STARLINK AND WHAT ARE ITS GOALS?

SpaceX from Elon Musk has the first two of his & # 39; Starlink & # 39; satellites for space network launched.

They are the first in a constellation of thousands of satellites, designed to provide low-cost broadband internet services from a low orbit around the earth.

The constellation, informally known as Starlink, and under development at the SpaceX facilities in Redmond, Washington.

The goal is to send super fast internet from space to your home.

Although satellite internet has been around for a while, it has suffered from high latency and unreliable connections.

Starlink is different. SpaceX says that placing a & # 39; constellation & # 39; of satellites in a low orbit around the world would produce fast and cable-like Internet.

The billionaire's company wants to create the global system to help it generate more money.

Musk said earlier that the company can offer three billion people who currently have no internet access a cheap way to go online.

It can also help finance a future city on Mars.

Helping mankind to reach the red planet is one of Musk's long-awaited goals and was what inspired him to start SpaceX.

The company recently submitted plans to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to launch 4,425 satellites into orbit around the earth – three times as many satellites currently in operation.

& # 39; Once fully deployed, the SpaceX system will pass virtually all parts of the Earth's surface and therefore basically have the ability to provide ubiquitous global service, & # 39; said the company.

& # 39; Every point on the Earth's surface will always see a SpaceX satellite. & # 39;

The network will provide internet access to the US and the rest of the world, it added.

This is expected to take more than five years and $ 9.8 billion (£ 7.1 billion) in investment, although satellite internet has been an expensive market in the past and analysts expect the final bill to be higher.

Musk compared the project with "rebuilding the internet in space" because it becomes less dependent on the existing network of submarine fiber optic cables that traverse the planet.

In the US, the FCC welcomed the scheme as a way to provide more people with internet.