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From a red sky to the red planet: the NASA image reveals the final tests of the Orion capsule

From a red sky to the red planet: the NASA image reveals the final tests of the Orion capsule

NASA has unveiled a stunning new image of the latest tests of the Orion capsule that could once bring humans to Mars.

The capsule will be fired next year on an unmanned mission around the moon, and will eventually be a workhorse & # 39; for NASA, who does everything from astronauts to the international space station to use on deep space missions to Mars.

The latest tests have allowed NASA to collaborate with the US Navy to validate procedures and hardware that will be used to restore the Orion spacecraft after it lands after deep space exploration. & # 39;

In the tests, the USS John P. Murtha used the test version of the Orion capsule at sunset in the Pacific Ocean.

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The latest tests have allowed NASA to collaborate with the US Navy to validate procedures and hardware that will be used to restore the Orion spacecraft after it lands after deep space exploration. & # 39;

The latest tests have allowed NASA to collaborate with USS John P. Murtha of the US Navy to validate procedures and hardware that will be used to restore the Orion spacecraft after it has descended as a result of reconnaissance missions in deep areas . & # 39;

The latest tests have allowed NASA to collaborate with USS John P. Murtha of the US Navy to validate procedures and hardware that will be used to restore the Orion spacecraft after it has descended as a result of reconnaissance missions in deep areas . & # 39;

The latest tests have allowed NASA to collaborate with USS John P. Murtha of the US Navy to validate procedures and hardware that will be used to restore the Orion spacecraft after it has descended as a result of reconnaissance missions in deep areas . & # 39;

WHAT WILL HAPPEN AS AN ORION LOSING?

NASA is developing multiple methods to get the crew out of the spacecraft on the day they return home, providing recovery personnel and mission controllers flexibility to take into account the health of the crew, the weather and the condition of the recovery personnel and equipment. the area in real life. -time.

Orion is designed to support a crew that has descended into the ocean for up to 24 hours.

It will be equipped with such a raft and a few extra necessities such as water, tools and door mirrors, if the crew were ever in a situation where a team of salvage personnel is not immediately available to help them

& # 39; The Underway Recovery Test-7 (URT-7) is part of a series of tests that the Recovery Team Recovery Team, along with the US Navy, is conducting to validate procedures and hardware that will be used for the Orion spacecraft to recover after it spatters down after deep-sea reconnaissance missions, "NASA said.

NASA technicians collaborated with sailors from John P. Murtha, Special Boat Team 12, and marine divers from Mobile Diving Salvage Unit 11 and Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 3 to test recovery operations of the Orion test article.

Tests were conducted throughout the day and night in various sea states.

• John P. Murtha was instructed to help NASA with their seventh Recovery test under water. Our crew did all the jobs perfectly and their recovery-at-sea experience and dedication directly contributed to our overall mission success, & Capt. Said Capt. Tony Roach, commanding officer USS John P. Murtha.

One of the more important capabilities of the ship is the ability of the ship to repair the test capsule using the ship's deck, designed to launch and restore amphibious vessels.

NASA astronaut training for a possible mission to Mars has previously conducted water maneuvers in a mock-up Orion space capsule in the Gulf of Mexico.

Several astronauts trained in the open water, about 4 miles (6.5 kilometers) from Galveston, Texas.

During the squeeze-out of the team, a joint team from the Orion and Ground Systems Development and Operations programs, together with assistance from the US Coast Guard, Navy and Air Force, evaluated how the crew with assistance and only from the capsule will come.

The astronauts wore bright orange training uniforms as they trained for a possible water landing, jumping into the water, using buoyancy aids and deploying a liferaft.

Coast Guard and other NASA and military security personnel were placed nearby.

"Astronauts returning to Earth in Orion will have spent many days in space, and we want to make sure that the last part of their journey runs smoothly, regardless of the conditions under which they land," said Tom Walker, rescue and recovery leader for Orion at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston.

The tests come as the power source & # 39; before the first Orion mission around the moon with NASA arrived. In Florida, the module will be merged with the Orion crew module built by Lockheed Martin, followed by more than a year of intensive testing before the first three-week mission in orbit around the moon is launched in 2020, but without people.

Our tests in the Gulf of Mexico allow us to execute our plans and hardware and to evaluate how we can get the crew out of Orion as safely and efficiently as possible. & # 39;

NASA is developing multiple methods to get the crew out of the spacecraft on the day they return home, providing recovery personnel and mission controllers flexibility to take into account the health of the crew, the weather and the condition of the recovery personnel and equipment. the area in real life. -time.

Orion has a diameter of 16.5 feet (5 meters) and a height of 3.3 meters (3.38 meters). It weighs approximately 31,000 pounds (14,000 kg) and has a habitable volume of 692 cubic feet (11 cubic meters).

Orion has a diameter of 16.5 feet (5 meters) and a height of 3.3 meters (3.38 meters). It weighs approximately 31,000 pounds (14,000 kg) and has a habitable volume of 692 cubic feet (11 cubic meters).

Orion has a diameter of 16.5 feet (5 meters) and a height of 3.3 meters (3.38 meters). It weighs approximately 31,000 pounds (14,000 kg) and has a habitable volume of 692 cubic feet (11 cubic meters).

Orion is designed to support a crew that has descended into the ocean for up to 24 hours.

When the capsule and crew return from deep-space missions, small boats of naval personnel will arrive soon after landing during one recovery method.

NASA astronaut Victor Glover reports back to astronaut Daniel Burbank that he is okay after jumping into the Gulf of Mexico from the capsule Orion that the astronauts use to carry out an emergency situation during recovery tests at about four miles from Galveston Island, Texas. The testing is the first time since the Apollo program that NASA applied such outflow techniques from a capsule in open water.

NASA astronaut Victor Glover reports back to astronaut Daniel Burbank that he is okay after jumping into the Gulf of Mexico from the capsule Orion that the astronauts use to carry out an emergency situation during recovery tests at about four miles from Galveston Island, Texas. The testing is the first time since the Apollo program that NASA applied such outflow techniques from a capsule in open water.

NASA astronaut Victor Glover reports back to astronaut Daniel Burbank that he is okay after jumping into the Gulf of Mexico from the capsule Orion that the astronauts use to carry out an emergency situation during recovery tests at about four miles from Galveston Island, Texas. The testing is the first time since the Apollo program that NASA applied such outflow techniques from a capsule in open water.

On this Thursday, July 13th, NASA astronaut Victor Glover jumps into the Gulf of Mexico as he practices an emergency aboard the Orion capsule they use for rehabilitation research, about four miles from Galveston Island, Texas. The testing is the first time since the Apollo program that NASA applied such outflow techniques from a capsule in open water. (Mark Mulligan / Houston Chronicle via AP)

On this Thursday, July 13th, NASA astronaut Victor Glover jumps into the Gulf of Mexico as he practices an emergency aboard the Orion capsule they use for rehabilitation research, about four miles from Galveston Island, Texas. The testing is the first time since the Apollo program that NASA applied such outflow techniques from a capsule in open water. (Mark Mulligan / Houston Chronicle via AP)

On this Thursday, July 13th, NASA astronaut Victor Glover jumps into the Gulf of Mexico as he practices an emergency aboard the Orion capsule they use for rehabilitation research, about four miles from Galveston Island, Texas. The testing is the first time since the Apollo program that NASA applied such outflow techniques from a capsule in open water. (Mark Mulligan / Houston Chronicle via AP)

They help the crew leave the side hatch of the capsule and on rafts and take them and the capsule back to a remote seagoing ship.

Crew members must also be prepared to come out of the spacecraft if conditions are not so favorable.

ORION VERSUS APOLLO – A GIANT CAPSULE UPGRADE

View of American frogmen from USS Yorktown standing on an inflatable area of ​​the Apollo 8 Command Module capsule with NASA astronauts, commander Frank Borman, Lunar Module pilot William Anders and Command Module pilot James Lovell prior to opening the hatch after a dive in the Pacific Ocean on 27 December 1968. The space flight Apollo 8 flew from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida on 21 December 1968.

View of American frogmen from USS Yorktown standing on an inflatable area of ​​the Apollo 8 Command Module capsule with NASA astronauts, commander Frank Borman, Lunar Module pilot William Anders and Command Module pilot James Lovell prior to opening the hatch after a dive in the Pacific Ocean on 27 December 1968. The space flight Apollo 8 flew from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida on 21 December 1968.

View of American frogmen from USS Yorktown standing on an inflatable area of ​​the Apollo 8 Command Module capsule with NASA astronauts, commander Frank Borman, Lunar Module pilot William Anders and Command Module pilot James Lovell prior to opening the hatch after a dive in the Pacific Ocean on 27 December 1968. The space flight Apollo 8 flew from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida on 21 December 1968.

Orion is 16.5 feet (5 meters) in diameter and 10.8 feet (3.3 meters) high

It weighs approximately 31,000 pounds (14,000 kg) and has a habitable volume of 692 cubic feet (11 cubic meters).

For comparison, Apollo's Command Module had a diameter of 12.8 feet (3.9 meters) and a height of 11.4 feet (3.47 meters).

The total weight was £ 12,787 (5,800 kg) and the volume of the crew cabin was 218 cubic feet (6.17 cubic meters).

A little known fact of the Apollo, Skylab and Apollo-Soyuz missions is that in space use the space capsules were rolled upside down in the ocean during about half of the landings.

Astronauts hung safely, with their faces down, in their belts as round, balloon-like devices called the right bulbs, inflated to roll back the capsules.

The spheres, part of the spacecraft's set-up system, were attached to the upper part of the capsules.

The balloons inflated with the compressor are designed to fold the capsules upright when they land or roll upside down after landing in the sea.

Naturally, designers expected such events because this system was installed on all command modules.

Astronauts Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins and Edwin & Buzz & # 39; Aldrin stand at a boiler plate Apollo capsule on the deck of the NASA ship Retriever during the water discharge training in the Gulf of Mexico.

Astronauts Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins and Edwin & Buzz & # 39; Aldrin stand at a boiler plate Apollo capsule on the deck of the NASA ship Retriever during the water discharge training in the Gulf of Mexico.

Astronauts Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins and Edwin & Buzz & # 39; Aldrin stand at a boiler plate Apollo capsule on the deck of the NASA ship Retriever during the water discharge training in the Gulf of Mexico. The new Orion capsule is much larger than Apollo

When returning to Earth, the spacecraft parachuted with an upright upright on the wide heat-resistant base, gently lowered by three enormous slides.

But, in rougher seas, or when the wind caught the parachutes as they floated to the surface, the capsules rolled or they were dragged over the ground.

When that happened, the pilot of the command module turned a switch to use the right-hand spheres and start the compressor fans to inflate them.

If the capsule were off course and it was not expected that recovery teams would arrive soon, or if water entered the crew module before they arrived, astronauts must be prepared to get out of the spacecraft alone.

NASA also evaluates how well crew members can leave the spacecraft within three minutes and in a smooth self without the help of recovery personnel.

On human missions Orion will be equipped with such a raft and a few extra emergency supplies such as water, tools and signal pins, should the crew ever be in a situation where a team of recovery personnel is not immediately available to help them.

NASA astronaut Mike Fincke jumps into a rescue raft of an Orion capsule that the astronauts use for a recovery test about four miles from Galveston Island, Texas in the Gulf of Mexico. The testing is the first time since the Apollo program that NASA applied such outflow techniques from a capsule in open water.

NASA astronaut Mike Fincke jumps into a rescue raft of an Orion capsule that the astronauts use for a recovery test about four miles from Galveston Island, Texas in the Gulf of Mexico. The testing is the first time since the Apollo program that NASA applied such outflow techniques from a capsule in open water.

NASA astronaut Mike Fincke jumps into a rescue raft of an Orion capsule that the astronauts use for a recovery test about four miles from Galveston Island, Texas in the Gulf of Mexico. The testing is the first time since the Apollo program that NASA applied such outflow techniques from a capsule in open water.

In this photo from Thursday, July 13, 2017, NASA astronauts Daniel Burbank, Stanley Love, Mike Fincke, and Victor Glover, NASA astronauts Daniel Burbank, Stanley Love, Mike Fincke, and Victor Glover, launch NASA's new Orion capsule, about four miles. from Galveston Island, Texas, in the Gulf of Mexico. The testing is the first time since the Apollo program that NASA applied such outflow techniques from a capsule in open water.

In this photo from Thursday, July 13, 2017, NASA astronauts Daniel Burbank, Stanley Love, Mike Fincke, and Victor Glover, NASA astronauts Daniel Burbank, Stanley Love, Mike Fincke, and Victor Glover, launch NASA's new Orion capsule, about four miles. from Galveston Island, Texas, in the Gulf of Mexico. The testing is the first time since the Apollo program that NASA applied such outflow techniques from a capsule in open water.

In this photo from Thursday, July 13, 2017, NASA astronauts Daniel Burbank, Stanley Love, Mike Fincke, and Victor Glover, NASA astronauts Daniel Burbank, Stanley Love, Mike Fincke, and Victor Glover, launch NASA's new Orion capsule, about four miles. from Galveston Island, Texas, in the Gulf of Mexico. The testing is the first time since the Apollo program that NASA applied such outflow techniques from a capsule in open water.

Astronauts and technical test persons carried Orion Crew Survival System space suits, modified versions of NASA & # 39; s orange Advanced Crew Escape suits for use during Orion launch and import, making testing as feasible as possible for mission scenario & # 39; s .

The testing builds on the development and implementation of recovery procedures conducted at the Neutral Buoyancy lab at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston, a pool of 6.2 million gallons used for training astronauts and a quiet environment for first tests.

Engineers expect them to carry out additional tests in the open water for the exodus of the crew.

The spaceship Orion is being prepared at the Johnson Space Center in nearby Houston.

It is intended for flights with NASA's new SLS or Space Launch System, the most powerful rocket the agency has ever built.

& # 39; ONE SMALL STEP FOR MAN & # 39; – THE APOLLO 11 MISSION

Apollo 11 landed on the moon surface on July 20, 1969.

"A small step for humans, one big leap for mankind," said Neil Armstrong as he landed on the surface of the moon 45 years ago and left the first footprint in the new era of space travel.

The capsule Apollo 11 is located in the restoration hanger in the Steven F. Udvar-hazy center of the National Air and Space Museum in Chantilly, prior to a planned four-city tour. Conservators give the capsule a full check - up and document the condition before it goes on a journey.

The capsule Apollo 11 is located in the restoration hanger in the Steven F. Udvar-hazy center of the National Air and Space Museum in Chantilly, prior to a planned four-city tour. Conservators give the capsule a full check - up and document the condition before it goes on a journey.

The capsule Apollo 11 is located in the restoration hanger in the Steven F. Udvar-hazy center of the National Air and Space Museum in Chantilly, prior to a planned four-city tour. Conservators give the capsule a full check – up and document the condition before it goes on a journey.

The two parts of the spacecraft consisted of the command module, the Columbia, manned by Collins and the eagle, manned by Armstrong and Aldrin.

The eagle has landed, Armstrong said, while the eagle arrived safely at a moon basin called The Sea of ​​Tranquility with just 40 seconds of fuel to burn.

After Armstrong set foot on our moon, Buzz followed Aldrin behind him and the two men read a plaque saying: & # 39; Here men of the planet first set foot on the moon, July 1969 AD We came in peace all humanity. & # 39;

Collins stayed in the Columbia and turned around the moon, although he was no less part of the historic mission.

Controlled by more than 600 million people around the world, Apollo 11 became the first spacecraft with human passengers to land on the moon.

CNN reports that Neil Armstrong acted as the commander, Buzz Aldrin was the pilot of the lunar module and Michael Collins acted as the pilot of the command module.

The crew traveled 240,000 miles from Earth to the Moon within 76 hours.

Networks such as ABC, CBS and NBC spent between $ 11 and $ 12 million on Apollo 11 coverage and covered the mission from Sunday morning to Monday evening.

Networking released a two-minute call on television between President Nixon, who spoke Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin via the Oval Office of the White House radio in what some people call the most historic phone call ever & # 39; to mention.

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