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Helping Monarch Butterflies, One Hatch & Release at a time

Helping Monarch Butterflies, One Hatch & Release at a time

The garden of Bernardsville by Kathleen Palmer is filled with azaleas, tiger lilies, hydrangeas, Susans with black eyes and Japanese red maple trees. But it is the common milkweed that attracts Palmer's favorite guests, the monarch butterflies that visit every year.

The well-kept jungle of Palmer serves as a retreat for the summer for the winged insects on their northern migration. Since 2006, the garden has been a registered interim station Monarch Watch, an organization that is committed to ensuring a future for monarchs in the event of loss of habitat. (Include other waypoints in New Jersey Duke Farms in Hillsborough.)

"I want to make people aware of the fate of the monarchs and all pollinators," says Palmer, 74.