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Mysterious Deep-Space Flashes: 19 More & # 39; Fast Radio Bursts & # 39; found it

Mysterious Deep-Space Flashes: 19 More & # 39; Fast Radio Bursts & # 39; found it

A huge amount of new fast radio bursts (FRBs) can help astronomers finally get a grip on these mysterious and powerful explosions from space.

A new study reports the detection of 19 formerly undiscovered FRBs, including the closest closest to the earth and the brightest ever seen. The results significantly increase the total number of impressions; only three dozen FRBs were previously known, with the first detection in 2007.

FRBs are short (milliseconds long) but intense emissions of radio light, which in almost a century can pack as much energy as our own sun produces. Their source is the subject of much debate and debate. For example, some researchers have suggested that FRBs can be generated by advanced extraterrestrial civilizations, although most astronomers prefer natural explanations, such as fast rotating neutron stars. [13 Ways to Hunt Intelligent Aliens]

The new study will be led by Ryan Shannon from the Swinburne University of Technology in Australia. Since early 2017, he and his team have been searching for FRBs using the Australian Square Kilometer Array Pathfinder (ASKAP), a network of 36 radio stations in Western Australia.

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