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NASA & # 39; s Juno probe captures an astonishing image of & # 39; magnificent, swirling clouds & # 39; on Jupiter

NASA & # 39; s Juno probe captures an astonishing image of & # 39; magnificent, swirling clouds & # 39; on Jupiter

NASA has unveiled a stunning new image of swirling "oil painting" storms on Jupiter.

It shows storms in Jupiter's dynamic North North Temperate Belt captured by NASA's Juno spaceship.

& # 39; Appearing in the scene are different bright white & # 39; pop-up & # 39; clouds and a counter-cyclonic storm, known as a white oval, & # 39; said NASA.

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This color-enhanced image was taken at 1:58 p.m. PDT on October 29, 2018 (4:58 am EDT) when the spacecraft performed its 16th closed flyby from Jupiter. At the time, Juno was about 7,000 kilometers from the top of the planet at a latitude of about 40 degrees north.

This color-enhanced image was taken at 1:58 p.m. PDT on October 29, 2018 (4:58 am EDT) when the spacecraft performed its 16th closed flyby from Jupiter. At the time, Juno was about 7,000 kilometers from the top of the planet at a latitude of about 40 degrees north.

WHAT IS A WHITE OVAL?

White ovals form large-scale large-scale storm that prevails in Jupiter.

White ovals can change shape, migrate through the atmosphere, displace one another for position and eventually even merge with each other. Despite all this, we know that white ovals have been able to survive in the atmosphere of Jupiter for 40 years or more – and can grow as big as the earth.

& # 39; A multitude of magnificent, swirling clouds in Jupiter's dynamic North North Temperate Belt are captured. & # 39;

It captures the intensity of the rays and vertebrae in Jupiter & # 39; s North North Temperate Belt.

The clouds are probably made of ammonia ice crystals, or possibly a combination of ammonia ice and water.

Although the region as a whole seems chaotic, there is a varying pattern of rotating, light-colored functions on the north and south sides of the zone.

Scientists believe that the large-scale dark areas are places where the clouds are deeper, based on infrared observations made simultaneously by Juno's JIRAM experiment and earth-based supporting observations.

This color-enhanced image was taken at 1:58 p.m. PDT on October 29, 2018 (4:58 am EDT) when the spacecraft performed its 16th closed flyby from Jupiter.

At the time, Juno was about 7,000 kilometers from the top of the planet at a latitude of about 40 degrees north.

Civilian scientists Gerald Eichstädt and Seán Doran created this image using the JunoCam imager of the spacecraft

The image, recorded in the final minutes of a recent close flyby from Jupiter, NASO's spacecraft Juno captured a departing image of the planet's swirling southern hemisphere. Juno at that time was about 55,600 miles (89,500 kilometers) of the cloud clouds of the planet, above a southern latitude of about 75 degrees.

The image, recorded in the final minutes of a recent close flyby from Jupiter, NASO's spacecraft Juno captured a departing image of the planet's swirling southern hemisphere. Juno at that time was about 55,600 miles (89,500 kilometers) of the cloud clouds of the planet, above a southern latitude of about 75 degrees.

NASA & # 39; s Juno probe revealed a stunning & # 39; rear view mirror & # 39; from Jupiter.

The image, captured in the final minutes of a recent close-up of Jupiter, gives a picture of the swirling southern hemisphere of the planet.

It shows the gigantic storms and enormous whirlpools that span the planet from a new perspective.

& # 39; The color enhanced image was taken at 7:13 PM. PDT on September 6, 2018 (10:13 am EDT) when the spacecraft performed its 15th close flyby from Jupiter, & # 39; NASA said.

Juno at that time was about 55,600 miles (89,500 kilometers) of the cloud clouds of the planet, above a southern latitude of about 75 degrees.

Civilian scientist Gerald Eichstädt created this image using the JunoCam imager of the spacecraft.

Previous images were largely concentrated on storms in the northern hemisphere of Jupiter.

Earlier this year, NASA approved an update for the scientific activities of Juno, allowing them to continue running until July 2021.

NASA & # 39; s Juno spacecraft picked up this image with color enhancement at 10:23 am. PDT on May 23, 2018 (1:23 a.m. EDT on May 24), when the spacecraft performed its 13th close flyby from Jupiter. Juno was at that time about 9,600 miles (15,500 kilometers) of the cloud clouds of the planet, above a north latitude of 56 degrees. The region seen here is somewhat chaotic and turbulent, given the different swirling cloud formations, NASA said.

NASA & # 39; s Juno spacecraft picked up this image with color enhancement at 10:23 am. PDT on May 23, 2018 (1:23 a.m. EDT on May 24), when the spacecraft performed its 13th close flyby from Jupiter. Juno was at that time about 9,600 miles (15,500 kilometers) of the cloud clouds of the planet, above a north latitude of 56 degrees. The region seen here is somewhat chaotic and turbulent, given the different swirling cloud formations, NASA said.

& # 39; This provides an additional 41 months in orbit around Jupiter and will enable Juno to achieve its primary scientific objectives & nbsp ;, NASA says.

Juno is in jobs of 53 days instead of 14-day jobs as initially planned because of concerns about valves on the fuel system of the spacecraft.

This longer job means that it takes more time to collect the required scientific data.

An independent panel of experts confirmed in April that Juno is on track to reach its scientific goals and is already delivering spectacular results.

The Juno spacecraft and all instruments are healthy and work nominally.

NASA has now funded Juno up to 2020.

The end of the prime operations is now expected in July 2021, with data analysis and mission close-out activities continued until 2022.

The color-enhanced image was taken at 11:31. PDT on May 23, 2018 (2:31 pm EDT on May 24), when the spacecraft performed its 13th close flyby from Jupiter. Juno was at that time about 44,300 miles (71,400 kilometers) of the cloud clouds of the planet, above a southern latitude of 71 degrees

The color-enhanced image was taken at 11:31. PDT on May 23, 2018 (2:31 pm EDT on May 24), when the spacecraft performed its 13th close flyby from Jupiter. Juno was at that time about 44,300 miles (71,400 kilometers) of the cloud clouds of the planet, above a southern latitude of 71 degrees

NASA has again released a stunning picture of swirling storms on Jupiter.

The latest image of the Juno probe shows gigantic storms raged over the planet's southern hemisphere.

It reveals the huge storms and swirling whirlpools all over the planet.

& # 39; The most recent image of the southern hemisphere of Jupiter was captured by NASA's Juno spacecraft on the outbound leg of a dense airflow from the gas giant planet, & # 39; NASA said.

WHAT IS THE JUNO MISSION FROM NASA TO JUPITER?

The Juno probe reached Jupiter in 2016 after a journey of five billion km from the earth

The Juno probe reached Jupiter in 2016 after a journey of five billion km from the earth

The Juno probe reached Jupiter on July 4, 2016, after a journey of 5 billion km (2.8 billion km) from the earth.

After a successful braking maneuver, it entered a long polar orbit to fly to 5,000 km (5,000 km) of the swirling cloud tops of the planet.

The probe once every two weeks drove within just 2,600 km (4,200 km) of clouds on the planet – too close to the world to provide coverage in a single image.

No other spacecraft has circled so close to Jupiter, although two others have been thrown to destruction by their atmosphere.

To complete his risky mission, Juno survived a circuit-frying radiation storm generated by the powerful magnetic field of Jupiter.

The maelstrom of high-energy particles that travel at near the speed of light is the harshest radiation environment in the solar system.

To cope with the conditions, the spacecraft was protected with special radiation hardened wiring and sensor shielding.

The most important brain & # 39; brain & # 39; – the onboard computer of the spacecraft – was housed in a reinforced vault made of titanium and weighs almost 400 pounds (172 kg).

It is expected that the vessel will study the composition of the planet's atmosphere until 2021.

A bright oval in the middle at the bottom stands out in the scene.

This property appears to be uniformly white in ground-based telescope observations, astronomers said.

& # 39; With JunoCam, however, we can observe the fine-scale structure in this weather system, including extra structures in it.

& # 39; No significant movement is visible on the inside of this function; like the Great Red Spot, the wind probably slows down to the middle. & # 39;

Civilian scientists Gerald Eichstädt and Seán Doran created this image using the JunoCam imager of the spacecraft.

Jupiter & # 39; s storms up close: the view is directed to the south on Jupiter in the direction of the upper left and the north to the bottom right. The North North Temperate Belt is the prominent red-orange band to the left of the center. At that time, the Juno spacecraft was located approximately 4,900 miles (7,900 kilometers) from the tops of the clouds of the gas giant planet at a latitude of about 41 degrees.

Jupiter & # 39; s storms up close: the view is directed to the south on Jupiter in the direction of the upper left and the north to the bottom right. The North North Temperate Belt is the prominent red-orange band to the left of the center. At that time, the Juno spacecraft was located approximately 4,900 miles (7,900 kilometers) from the tops of the clouds of the gas giant planet at a latitude of about 41 degrees.

These observations show warmer, and therefore deeper, thermal emissions from these regions.

To the right of the bright zone, and further to the north of the planet, the striking striped structure of Jupiter becomes less clear and an area with individual cyclones can be seen, alternating with smaller, dark anti-cyclones.

Civilian scientist Kevin M. Gill created this image using the JunoCam imager of the spacecraft.

Most images tend to focus on Jupiter's Great Red Spot.

Once large enough to swallow three earths, Jupiter & # 39; s & # 39; cracks Great Red Spot & # 39; with a speed of 140 kilometers (230 km) per year, which causes the clouds to rise, according to a recent NASA study.

WHAT IS THE GREAT RED SPOT OF JUPITER?

Jupiter's Great Red Spot is a gigantic oval of crimson clouds in the southern hemisphere of Jupiter that race in the direction of the clock around the circumference of the oval.

The biggest storm in the solar system, it looks like a deep red sphere surrounded by layers of pale yellow, orange and white.

Caught between two jet streams, the Big Red Spot is an anti-cyclone that swirls around a center of high atmospheric pressure, turning it in the opposite direction to hurricanes on Earth.

Jupiter's Great Red Spot is a gigantic oval of crimson clouds in the southern hemisphere of Jupiter running counterclockwise around the perimeter of the oval

Jupiter's Great Red Spot is a gigantic oval of crimson clouds in the southern hemisphere of Jupiter running counterclockwise around the perimeter of the oval

Winds in the storm are measured at several hundred miles per hour, with windstorms larger than any storm on Earth, NASA astronomers have said.

At the end of the nineteenth century it was estimated at about 35,000 miles (about 56,000 km) in diameter – wide enough to fit four earths next to each other.

With a size of 16,000 kilometers (16 miles) from 3 April 2017, the Big Red Spot is 1.3 times the width of the earth and gradually decreases over time.

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