Scientists bring back gigantic 290 million year old lizards from the dead

A five foot long giant lizard that roamed the earth for nearly 300 million years has been brought back from the dead – in the form of a robot.

It dates from dinosaurs, reptiles, birds and mammals and was brought back to life with the help of digital scans and a robot based on a perfectly preserved fossil.

Scientists believe that their research helps understand how animals have moved from the oceans to eventually conquer land.

A five foot long gigantic lizard that roamed the earth for almost 300 million years has been brought back from the dead - in the form of a robot

A five foot long gigantic lizard that roamed the earth for almost 300 million years has been brought back from the dead – in the form of a robot

Scientists believe that their research helps understand how animals have moved from the oceans to eventually conquer land

Scientists believe that their research helps understand how animals have moved from the oceans to eventually conquer land

Effective, upright movements are now thought to be older than a group of animals called amniotic – a huge group of creatures including reptiles, birds and mammals.

Scientists linked fossils from a large lizard called Orobates pabsti that lived on well-preserved footprints 290 million years ago and made simulations with computers and a robot to understand its unique way of walking.

The movement would have helped move the ground better and further away from the water than previously thought, scientists believe.

Full remnants of the primitive cousin of modern reptiles were excavated two decades ago in a quarry in the Thuringian Forest in central Germany.

Analysis of four living amphibians and reptile species was then used to recreate the running style.

It was a five foot long animal weighing about nine pounds (four kilograms) and had a long body and a tail with short legs and a small skull. It has also been compared to a crocodile.

People share the same common ancestor with this reptilian creature as lizards, snakes, turtles, crocodiles, birds and mammals.

The findings, published in the journal Nature, reveal that it could walk more upright than was suspected.

Dr. John Nyakatura, of the Humboldt University in Berlin, Germany, said: "Our statistics indicate that Orobates showed more advanced locomotion than previously assumed for earlier tetrapods (four-legged animals), suggesting that advanced terrestrial locomotion preceded diversification of crown amniots. & # 39;

Orobates pabsti that lived 290 million years ago and was older than dinosaurs, reptiles, birds and mammals and was brought back to life with the help of digital scans and a robot based on a perfectly preserved fossil

Orobates pabsti that lived 290 million years ago and was older than dinosaurs, reptiles, birds and mammals and was brought back to life with the help of digital scans and a robot based on a perfectly preserved fossil

Scientists used a fossil from a large lizard that lived 290 million years ago. They found preserved footprints of the animal and adapted it to the skeleton

Scientists used a fossil from a large lizard that lived 290 million years ago. They found preserved footprints of the animal and adapted it to the skeleton

Scientists linked fossils from a large lizard called Orobates pabsti that lived on well-preserved footprints 290 million years ago and created simulations with computers and a robot to understand its unique way of walking

The digital scans were made possible by combining the fossil record with the advancement of four species of amphibians and reptiles to get an idea of ​​the nuances of the animal's joints.

The digital scans were made possible by combining the fossil record with the advancement of four species of amphibians and reptiles to get an idea of ​​the nuances of the animal's joints.

Dr. Nyakatura added: & # 39; As far as we know, we have previously tried not to carry out reconstructions of the locomotor characteristics of stem macrota on the basis of multiple quantitative methods.

Previous methods were based only on anatomical features, ambiguous locomotor information stored in fossils or non-specific modeling of dynamics.

& # 39; Here we investigate quantifiable plausible corridors of the stem amniote Orobates pabsti, a species known from a complete body fossil preserved in association with trackways.

& # 39; We probably reconstruct hallways that match the footprints. Our statistics indicate that Orobates showed more advanced locomotion than previously assumed for earlier tetrapods. & # 39;

WHAT KILLED THE DINOSAURS?

Approximately 65 million years ago, non-breeding dinosaurs were exterminated and more than half of all species in the world were destroyed.

This massive extinction cleared the way for the rise of mammals and the appearance of humans.

The asteroid Chicxulub is often cited as a possible cause of the extinction of the Cretaceous Paleogene.

The asteroid hit a shallow sea in what is now the Gulf of Mexico.

The collision caused a huge dust and soot cloud that caused global climate change and destroyed 75 percent of all animal and plant species.

Researchers claim that the soot needed for such global catastrophe can only come from a direct impact on rocks in shallow water around Mexico, which are particularly rich in hydrocarbons.

Within 10 hours of the impact, a huge tsunami was torn by the Gulf Coast, experts think.

Approximately 65 million years ago, non-breeding dinosaurs were exterminated and more than half of all species in the world were destroyed. The asteroid Chicxulub is often cited as a possible cause of the extinction of the Cretaceous Paleogene (stock image)

Approximately 65 million years ago, non-breeding dinosaurs were exterminated and more than half of all species in the world were destroyed. The asteroid Chicxulub is often cited as a possible cause of the extinction of the Cretaceous Paleogene (stock image)

This caused earthquakes and landslides in areas up to Argentina.

But while the waves and eruptions were alive, the creatures that lived in those days did not just live on the waves – the heat was much worse.

During the investigation of the event, researchers discovered small particles of rock and other debris that was shot in the air when the asteroid crashed.

These small particles were called spheres and covered the planet with a thick layer of soot.

Experts explain that losing the light from the sun caused a complete collapse of the water system.

This is because the phytoplankton base of almost all aquatic food chains would have been eliminated.

It is believed that the more than 180 million years of evolution that the world brought to the Cretaceous point was destroyed in less than the lifetime of a Tyrannosaurus rex, which is about 20 to 30 years.