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& # 39; Be a nicer airline & # 39 ;: pressure on Ryanair grows to repay passengers who have been beaten with a £ 115 fine due to name change

The pressure on Ryanair increases to repay passengers affected by a name-taking penalty – with a reputable consumer champion who complains directly to the airline and the Civil Aviation Authority.

Approximately 160 furious Ryanair passengers traveling with partners or friends are beaten with £ 115 fees after the last names of their companions were automatically changed to incorrect versions – although the correct details were entered at the time of booking.

So far, the airline refused to pay back the passengers affected by the glitch free of charge, and now money expert Martin Lewis has directly appealed to Ryanair to make a more enjoyable airline & # 39; to be and ensure that the people involved are not left out of the wallet & # 39 ;.

On Ryanair, pressure is increasing to repay passengers struck by a sanction error in name change – with renowned consumer champion Martin Lewis who complains directly to the airline

The glitch seemed to happen when passengers booked flights for a second person (or more) with different surnames, for example their partner, or for a group of friends.

These customers consistently claim that the Ryanair reservation system automatically changes the names of their companions to be the same as the main traveler or account holder's last name.

Those who did not notice the error in Ryanair's grace period for the free name change were left with a £ 115 surcharge to change it to the correct name.

Money-saving expert Martin Lewis, pictured, who has directly appealed to Ryanair to make a 'nicer airline' a # 39; to be

In a letter to Michael O & # 39; Leary, CEO of Ryanair, the founder of MoneySavingExpert.com wrote: "I know that in recent years you have declared Ryanair & # 39; want to make a nicer airline & # 39; I hope you can fulfill that promise in this case.

& # 39; Unfortunately, my personal letter to you is our last resort. We have raised this issue with your press team since December. Yet the involvement and response we had was weak.

& # 39; There is a seemingly blasé attitude towards customers who feel hard by. That is why we have today also submitted a file of convincing evidence of more than 160 complaints to the civil aviation authority.

& # 39; These customers tell us that they have been penalized for incorrect last names in their bookings, despite the fact that they entered this information correctly at the time of booking.

& # 39; This error does not always seem to be the customer's fault, but Ryanair has charged the affected £ 115 to correct what appears to be its own mistake.

& # 39; The behavior of your business, by refusing to pay back customers who have been affected or saying that they can not travel, does not appear to be the behavior of a & # 39; nice airline & # 39; to be.

I am sure you will be shocked to learn that this has happened – and that you want to put it right – instead of waiting for regulatory involvement. & # 39;

So far, the no-nonsense airline has refused to pay back passengers affected by the name change glitch

Mr. Lewis also claimed in the letter that some customers who were dealing with the compensation due to the technical malfunction actually broke their flights because it was cheaper than paying the costs.

He added: "We hope that you will find out what led to the problem, that it occurs again and ensures that those who have affected it are not left out of the pocket.

& # 39; If you find that our evidence is wrong and there is no technical problem, we would like to receive a detailed explanation of why this has happened on such a huge scale. & # 39;

Meanwhile, Mr. Lewis said in a separate letter to the Civil Aviation Authority that he thought it was time for "regulatory measures to protect customers."

He wrote: "So far we have had more than 160 Ryanair customers who said that they have come across the problem, who are willing to participate in a file that is included for your attention.

"Given the repeated and widespread nature of these errors and the obvious unwillingness of Ryanair to deal with this problem, we believe it is time for regulatory intervention to protect customers.

Ryanair must be forced to find out what the problem is, to prevent it from happening again and to ensure that those affected are not left out of the pocket. & # 39;

Last week, Ryanair quietly called up prices for boarding with priority and baggage. Pictured is a table on the Ryanair website, which shows the new rates

The letters come just a few days after the Dublin-based airline had quietly increased its tariffs for boarding and baggage a few months after the introduction of a brand new baggage policy.

Rules that were filed on November 1 stipulated that passengers would no longer be able to carry free small suitcases in the hold and would have to pay for any bag that does not fit under the seat at the front.

Passengers could pay between £ 6 and £ 8 for priority boarding, which meant they could take a second larger bag in the cabin, or pay between £ 8 and £ 10 to check in a bag up to 10 kg, or £ 25 for a bag larger than that.

However, it has now been found that if passengers want to check in to a bag up to 10 kg, the prices have risen to between £ 10 and £ 12.

Similarly, the top price for boarding has increased with priority from £ 8 to £ 10.

MailOnline Travel contacted Ryanair for comments.

THE LETTER FROM MARTIN LEWIS COMPLETELY WITH RYANAIR ON THE GLITCH OF THE NAME

Dear Mr O & # 39; Leary,

I am writing to inform you personally about what appears to be an important and serious abuse of consumer rights by your airline. I know that in recent years you have indicated that you Ryanair & # 39; a nicer airline & # 39; want to make. I hope you can fulfill that promise in this case.

Unfortunately, my personal letter to you is our last resort. We have raised this issue with your press team since December. Yet the involvement and response we had was weak. There is a seemingly blasé attitude towards customers who feel hard. That is why we have today also submitted a file of convincing evidence of more than 160 complaints to the civil aviation authority.

These customers tell us that they have been penalized for incorrect last names in their bookings, even though they entered this information correctly at the time of booking. This error does not always seem to be the customer's fault, but Ryanair has charged the affected £ 115 to correct what appears to be its own error.

The behavior of your business, by refusing to pay back customers who have been affected or saying that they can not travel, does not seem to be the behavior of a "nice airline". I am sure you will be shocked to learn that this has happened – and that you want to put it right – instead of waiting for regulatory involvement.

From the evidence that MSE has collected, a clear pattern has emerged that probably indicates a system error:

  • Passengers booked flights for a second person (or more) with different surnames, for example their partner, or for a group of friends.
  • These customers consistently claim that the Ryanair reservation system automatically changes the names of their companions to be the same as the main traveler or account holder's last name.
  • Those who have not noticed the mistake during the Ryanair 24-hour grace period for free name changes are faced with a £ 115 surcharge to change it to the right name – many have already paid it.
  • Some customers had to book their flights again, because this was cheaper than paying the costs.

We hope that you will find out what has caused the problem, prevent it from returning and ensure that those who have affected it are not left out of the pocket. If you believe that our evidence is wrong and there is no technical problem, we would like to receive a detailed explanation of why this has happened on such a huge scale.

I am looking forward to your response.

Regards,

Martin Lewis, founder and chairman, MoneySavingExpert.com

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