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Divers make a wonderful selfie with SIX FOOT LONG sunfish in Cape Town

Divers make a wonderful selfie with SIX FOOT LONG sunfish in Cape Town

Visual material made by divers in South Africa shows that they have a rare encounter with a huge moonfish that makes them dwarf while swimming next to them.

The gigantic six-and-a-half-foot moonfish plunged into the water as James Taylor and his friends were swimming off the coast of Cape Town.

The incredible photos show the divers swimming alongside the huge fish, scientifically referred to as a Mola mola, and posing with it as it floats to the surface.

Taylor said: "I always try to take a GoPro with me when I'm in the ocean because there is almost always something interesting that pops up and it just happened that something very interesting came out of the hand this day.

"Nature is incredible and the more time we spend with her, the more of her secrets she reveals.

The huge six-and-a-half-foot Mola Mola sunfish plunged into the water when James Taylor and his friends swam on the coast of Cape Town

The huge six-and-a-half-foot Mola Mola sunfish plunged into the water when James Taylor and his friends swam on the coast of Cape Town

The huge six-and-a-half-foot Mola Mola sunfish plunged into the water when James Taylor and his friends swam on the coast of Cape Town

Taylor and his friends pose with the unusually shaped ocean dweller after it fell into the water next to them

Taylor and his friends pose with the unusually shaped ocean dweller after it fell into the water next to them

Taylor and his friends pose with the unusually shaped ocean dweller after it fell into the water next to them

Taylor says the photo's were the coolest selfies he'd ever seen, but said some people think they're fake because of the size and shape of the fish

Taylor says the photo's were the coolest selfies he'd ever seen, but said some people think they're fake because of the size and shape of the fish

Taylor says the photo's were the coolest selfies he'd ever seen, but said some people think they're fake because of the size and shape of the fish

I love it when you witness amazing things and have the ability to catch them first hand and share them with the world.

& # 39; People say the images are fake, but when I show them the video clip, they say it's the coolest selfie they've ever seen. & # 39;

The unusually shaped ocean-moon fish or Mola mola are the heaviest bony fish in the world and can weigh nearly 5,000 pounds and become as big as 14 feet tall, and 10 feet tall, according to National Geographic.

The angelfish are known to be near the surface of the water and are often confused with sharks because of their dorsal fin.

The angelfish are known to be near the surface of the water and are often confused with sharks because of their dorsal fin.

The angelfish are known to be near the surface of the water and are often confused with sharks because of their dorsal fin.

The species is native to tropical and temperate waters around the world. It looks like a fish head with a tail and the main body is flattened laterally

The species is native to tropical and temperate waters around the world. It looks like a fish head with a tail and the main body is flattened laterally

The species is native to tropical and temperate waters around the world. It looks like a fish head with a tail and the main body is flattened laterally

The species is native to tropical and temperate waters around the world. It looks like a fish head with a tail and the main body is flattened laterally.

Among humans, angelfish is considered a delicacy in some parts of the world, including Japan, Korea and Taiwan. In the EU regulations prohibit the sale of fish and fishery products derived from the Mola family.

The sunfish is the heaviest bony fish in the world and can weigh nearly 5,000 kilos and can grow to 14 feet tall and 10 feet tall, according to National Geographic

The sunfish is the heaviest bony fish in the world and can weigh nearly 5,000 kilos and can grow to 14 feet tall and 10 feet tall, according to National Geographic

The sunfish is the heaviest bony fish in the world and can weigh nearly 5,000 kilos and can grow to 14 feet tall and 10 feet tall, according to National Geographic

The slow moving fish are hosts of many different species of parasites and will propel themselves as high as 10 feet above the water to shake them off.

They live far in the open ocean, but cherish themselves on the surface. When their enormous dorsal fin breaks through the water, angelfishes are generally confused with sharks.

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