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European Parliament votes for tricky new online copyright laws

European Parliament votes for tricky new online copyright laws

European Parliament votes for tricky new online copyright laws

"Computer says no" – The copyright directive requires upload filters that can stop memes. Image (c) BBC

The European Parliament has overwhelmingly approved strict new rules for online copyright that critics say they make de facto filters for uploading on all but the smallest websites mandatory.

In particular, Members of the European Parliament have renounced Article 11 of the Copyright Directive in the Digital Single Market, which allows publishers to require licenses for links, while Article 13 requires platform providers to "take appropriate and proportionate measures" to prevent copyright be violated.

Despite the widespread opposition from critics who said the measures were overkill, members voted 438 and 226, with the mainstream blocs – the European People's Party and Social Democrats – largely in favor of the measure.

The votes for Articles 11 and 13 were leaner, Article 11 ran from 393 to 279 and Article 13 was voted on by Members of the European Parliament with 366 votes in favor and 297 votes.

The directive must still receive the final approval of the European Parliament in January next year, and the leaders of the EU Member States will have to adopt the directive before individual EU Member States will be forced to draft national legislation to implement the directive. explain.

Antonio Tajani, President of the European Parliament, claimed that the vote was "a victory for all citizens" and claimed that it would "end the digital Wild West".

Marijana Petir, an MEP representing the Croatian peasant party, attached to the regular EPP, also voted to claim that it "would provide better protection and fair compensation for journalists, publishers, artists and artists … while free internet use for all EU countries is maintained.

Jim Killock, executive director of the Open Rights Group, claimed that the directive would prevent people from sharing a wide range of non-copyright-related material, as platform providers would be encouraged to be cautious about what they allow users to upload.

"Article 13 creates a copyrighted regime that makes any image, text, meme or video that copyrighted material seems to zap, regardless of whether it is used legally or not, this is disappointing and will open the door to more demands for the cofee of Robocop. " Killock said.

He continued: "The directive is not yet a law and could improve during trialogue negotiations and we will continue to oppose these measures that will lead to the removal of legal material in this way."

Pirate Party MEP Julia Reda claimed that the Copyright Directive "would be a serious blow to the free and open internet" and would even extend to hosting providers, who should follow all uploads in real time to prevent them from falling under the Directive.

The measures in the Copyright Directive go hand in hand with anti-terrorism measures that are also being considered by the European Union. This will oblige platform providers to destroy material that governments regard as extremist or to promote terrorism within an hour.

Platform providers who do not follow instructions to remove material quickly enough can be subject to GDPR fines of up to four percent of the revenue. Each site with a comment section accessible within the EU falls under the auspices of the proposed legislation, according to Reda, with the requirement to remove content on request, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

See also: from EMI to YouTube, musicians always lose – but the EU copyright proposals can not help

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